Your biggest customer is outlining their latest list of “value-added” demands (FYI, that’s code for free stuff). They eventually get to the bottom of a list that includes everything from a free sponsorship to two tickets to next year’s production of Frozen on Ice. Once complete, they look to you for your response. You look the client in the eyes, smile and calmly say, “No.”

I know you’re thinking, “Are you crazy?”

OK, so let’s modify our response from “No” to No, But, If ™. A four-step process:

  • First say “No” nicely, remorsefully, respectfully, and carefully.
  • Follow up “No” with, “But, I could…” You will now fill in this blank with the most important items from their list (Like those Frozen tickets).
  • Next add, “If, you would…” It’s time to fill your needs (Larger share, longer agreement, higher rate).
  • Then ask for the commitment, “Can we make this happen?” Pause and wait for their response.

 
Example:No, I’m sorry, I can’t add in the web streaming at no charge. But, I could add it in at a very low charge if you would be willing to extend your schedule from 13 to 26 weeks. Can we make that happen?”

The process will work, but only if you try. Good selling and remember it’s OK to just say, No, But, If ™ For additional training insights or to view the video course, No, But, If ™, login to your designated account or click here to sign up for a 7-day trial.

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